VICTIMS OF VIOLENCE VISAS

Individuals who are not citizens or residents who are victims of certain crimes and who work with the police to report crimes may be eligible for a visa. 


Do you think you may be eligible for a visa because of violence you have suffered? Schedule an appointment with us.


If you have been the victim of a crime, always report the crime to the police.

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OTHER PATHS TO LEGAL STATUS

Some individuals who cannot obtain legal immigrant status through family members or other visas may be eligible for another type of status. The No More A Stranger Foundation works with individuals who qualify for each of the following. 

Temporary Protected Status (TPS)

Deferred Action Child for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS)

Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act (NACARA)


Do you need help with a specialized application? Schedule an appointment with us.

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MIGRANT WORKER RIGHTS

The law protects migrant workers from abusive employment practices. Migrant workers must be paid at least the federal minimum wage. The law offers additional protections. 


Do you think you may have been unfairly treated by an employer? Schedule an appointment with us.

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IMMIGRANT-OWNED BUSINESSES

Part of the No More A Stranger Foundation’s mission is to provide legal services to businesses that are owned or operated in substantial part by immigrants, migrants, or refugees. If you are interested in legal counsel for your business, contact us.

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CLASSES

The No More a Stranger Foundation currently offers the following classes:

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STUDENT VISAS

Individuals who are not citizens or residents of the United States may apply for a student visa from within their home country. Students must apply and be accepted to a university in the United States before applying for a student visa. After completing their studies, some individuals are eligible to work for one year through an optional practical training program.


If you are interested in applying for a student visa, contact us.

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THE TEAM

 

CARL HERNANDEZ III

Founder

Before accepting a faculty appointment at BYU Law, Mr. Hernandez enjoyed a successful law practice in an area with some of the world’s richest agricultural soil, but with one of the highest levels of poverty in the United States—California’s San Joaquin Valley.  As a young man, he picked fruit in orchards in an area where Cesar Chavez organized the United Farm Workers of America and he worked in a packinghouse adjacent to where John Steinbeck penned parts of his classic novel, The Grapes of Wrath.  In his youth and as a practicing lawyer, he witnessed families, churches, schools, agri-businesses, government agencies and community-based organizations work together to improve the quality of life for migrant farm workers, immigrants and underrepresented minorities both during and after the Civil Rights Movement.  These early experiences were formative to his professional identity and serve as a foundation for the work his now does to serve the poor including migrants and immigrants.


Mr. Hernandez has made significant contributions to helping create a vision, framework, plan and a well-established curriculum for professional skills teaching at the BYU Law School and performs extensive work training law students to perform immigration practice before U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.